The Value in Being Different

“I was not born in this country. I didn’t grow up in any one particular religion and I’m gay.” I knew after hearing Wentworth say this that I was not alone and that I have the power to share my story and inspire people to value their uniqueness and learn to accept who we are as individuals.

I was 18 years old the first time watching Wentworth Millers’ speech about overcoming his struggles and what it was like for him being “different.” I’ve always had the feeling of being singular and different, growing up being a shy and quiet person, but some say they are some of the kindest people in the world. Why has it been so difficult for me to accept myself being “different”? There is great value in our differences, but I needed to accept the individual person that I am, and what makes me authentic.

The world tends to see what is different as something ugly and wrong as if anything “abnormal” is something needing to be fixed.

In high school, I wanted to feel like I was a part of something. I wanted to feel like I wasn’t singular or different. I tried hard to fit in, but trying to be something I wasn’t was emotionally draining for me. I had turned into this person I didn’t like for the purpose of trying to fit in, but at the same time I hated what I was, I hated being oversensitive, stupid, a daydreamer, and sad. I couldn’t stand being different and showing it to the world.

As teenagers, our worth is determined by the acceptance of society. I had to understand that criticism came not because I was wrong or different but because everyone has their own way of thinking and acting. Some people have a limited mindset that creates an inability to accept other differences. That was not my problem.

My problem was that I had given other people the power to control my self-esteem instead of finding acceptance and love within myself. I have had to start to forgive and love myself and look at myself through my eyes.

I have come to realize that I am beautiful just the way I am. Everyone is different in some way or another and there are few people who show it to the world. I challenge you to be beautifully different.

Global Handwashing Day

Protect yourself and others from COVID-19 by washing your hands

Piedmont College encourages students to participate in Global Handwashing Day on Oct. 15. It’s in your hands to keep everyone safe

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News Provided By Piedmont College and the CDC Sep. 4, 2020, 2:41 ET

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Piedmont College wants to motivate people around campus and the community to improve their

handwashing habits and understand the importance of washing your hands.

An article published by the CDC talks about how Global Handwashing Day has reduced the number of young children who get sick and helps them understand the importance of washing their hands, which keeps them and their community safe.

“Soap acts like a mediator between the water and the oil and grease on your hand,” said Dr. Juila Schmitz, biology professor at Piedmont College. “That’s why hot water and soap is better than hand sanitizer plus the rubbing action.”

According to another article from the CDC you need to wash your hands for at least 20 seconds to be able to remove all the harmful germs and chemicals from your hands. Global Handwashing Day is intended to remind the public about how to properly wash their hands.

Washing your hands everyday will reduce the likelihood of you becoming contaminated with germs that can enter your body and can cause a serious illness,” said Beth Powell, a biologist from Averett University in Virginia.

On Thursday Oct. 15, Piedmont will be hosting a handwashing event in the Commons, as well as sponsoring a TikTok contest open to all students. A prize will be given to the student who posts the most informative and entertaining video about the importance of handwashing.

For more information about Global Handwashing Day and the event at Piedmont College, email Joe Dennis at jdennis@piedmont.edu.  

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About Piedmont College  

One of the most dynamic small colleges in the Southeast, Piedmont is an independent liberal arts college of more than 2,260 students. The college’s four schools—Arts & Sciences, Business, Education, and Nursing & Health Sciences—develop tomorrow’s leaders by engaging students in the classroom, in their community, and around the world. Founded in 1897, Piedmont offers bachelor’s, master’s, specialist, and doctoral degree programs at its Demorest residential campus in the foothills of the northeast Georgia mountains and at its Athens campus in the heart of Georgia’s Classic City. Information can be found at www.piedmont.edu

Global Handwashing Day

Rowan Edmonds

706-347-3374

redmonds0323@lions.piedmont.edu

Global Handwashing Day 

Dr. Julia Schmitz discusses the importance of handwashing. 

Demorest, Georgia, Sept. 4, 2020 – With the world in a pandemic, students and faculty at Piedmont College are collaborating to host an event on Oct. 15 for Global Handwashing Day. 

“You obviously can’t wash your hands constantly, but you definitely want to make sure you wash your hands before eating,” said Dr. Julia Schmitz, a biology professor at Piedmont College. “Pretty much all the time, whenever you can.” 

Until this year, Global Handwashing Day was just one of those fun little “holidays” that was always looked over. It was one of those things that would make someone mildly chuckle at the thought of having a day to celebrate and acknowledge handwashing. However, when the pandemic rolled around, handwashing became a little less goofy and a little more serious. 

“Most people know about the importance of washing hands, but many don’t know how to properly wash their hands,” said Joe Dennis, an assistant mass communications professor at Piedmont College. “It’s my hope that an event like this will help show people the proper way to wash their hands.” 

With a pandemic going on, stressing the importance of washing our hands has become even more critical than ever before. On Thursday, Oct.15, the college will recognize Global Handwashing Day by holding a handwashing event on campus, as well as hosting a TikTok video competition for students.  

For more information about the event, email Joe Dennis at jdennis@piedmont.edu. For more information about handwashing, visit https://globalhandwashing.org 

About Piedmont College – One of the most dynamic small colleges in the Southeast, Piedmont is an independent liberal arts college of more than 2,260 students. The college’s four schools – Arts & Sciences, Business, Education, and Nursing & Health Sciences – develop tomorrow’s leaders by engaging students in the classroom, in their community, and around the world. Founded in 1897, Piedmont offers bachelor’s, master’s, specialist, and doctoral degree programs at its Demorest residential campus in the foothills of the northeast Georgia mountains and at its Athens campus in the heart of Georgia’s Classic City. Information can be found at www.piedmont.edu 

The Impact of the Marvel Cinematic Universe

Growing up, my dad would always tell me stories before I went to bed. A man flying around in a gold and red suit of armor, a super soldier over 100 years old who has a thing for shields, and a scientist with breathtaking anger management issues. I was never told the story about a princess who needed her Prince Charming, but rather the adventures of superheroes who would give their all to save the world. I was 7 years old when the first Iron Man made it to the big screen in May 2008, and being one of the youngest people in a room full of comic book nerds was exhilarating to me. At that point, the only Marvel movies that had been released were X-men, so only the true comic book fans knew about Iron Man, Captain America, and Thor. 

The Marvel Cinematic Universe started out as a small group of comic junkies and quickly grew into a massive franchise with millions of fans. The comics were mostly written by Stan Lee, the father of all things Marvel. He had a cameo in just about every movie up until his passing in November of 2018. Iron Man one was the first MCU movies that was released with Tony Stark, played by Robert Downey Jr., taking his role as the “god father of the MCU.” Downey made roughly $500,000 in this film, which is miniscule to what he made in his final film, Avengers Endgame, where he was paid $20 million upfront. The movie itself is currently the number one movie in the world and made $2.8 billion. It was an accumulation of 23 films released over a 12-year period, bringing an end to the characters we all know and love. That being said, no one needs to say goodbye to the Marvel films just yet. Plans for new movies are going to be released with all new heroes, villains, and plots. We will delve further into some of the newer marvel characters as well, always keeping the originals in our heart. 

The movies had such a massive impact on me, and I tried to use them as guidelines to my life. I wanted to have the heart to stand up for the little guy like Captain America and Spiderman, the ability to be a good leader even after making so many mistakes like Thor and King T’challa. I wanted to have the drive to be the best no matter what like Iron Man, but to also be disciplined like Black Widow. I, like many others, grew up with these movies and while I am sad to see this particular era come to an end, I am so excited to see what’s in store for the Marvel Cinematic Universe.

Global Hand Washing Day

A close up of a sign

Description automatically generated

For Immediate Release

Sept. 4, 2020

For more information, press only:

PR Contact Name: Jaela Dodson

Phone number: 478-919-1422

Email: jdodson0430@lions.piedmont.edu

For more information on Handwashing:

Website: https://www.cdc.gov/handwashing/index.html

Clean Hands for All

Piedmont Professor Dr. Julia Schmitz enlightens students on effective handwashing

Demorest, Georgia, Sept. 4, 2020 — Piedmont College will be participating in Global Handwashing day on Oct. 15, helping to spread awareness for the best, and most effective way to fight germs and save lives.

“When you’re washing your hands with soap, the bacteria tends to stick to the grease and oils on your hands. The soap acts as a mediator,” said Dr. Julia Schmitz, biology professor at Piedmont College.

When debating whether to use hand sanitizer or soap, Dr. Schmitz said the chemical properties in both products produce effective results, but handwashing is clearly better. Hand Sanitizer contains alcohol and kills bacteria but, leaves a slight number of bacteria remaining on your hands.

Hand soap acts as a mediator between the oils on your hands and water. Rinsing hand soap allows for the bacteria to also rinse off your hands, unlike how hand sanitizer leaves the oils on your hands. Washing and rinsing with soap and water allows for bacteria to flow off of your hands for effective clean and sanitary finish. 

“We can’t tolerate as hot of the water we need to really effectively kill the germs,” said Schmitz. “But handwashing does remove more of the germs.”

Hot water is the better temperature to use when handwashing. Dr. Schmitz advises to use a temperature as hot as tolerable over cold water. Everyone should wash their hands constantly and thoroughly, but especially before, between and after cooking, when caring for someone who is sick, elderly or adolescent, and when handling garbage or pets. 

Global Handwashing Day is dedicated to increasing awareness and importance of handwashing with soap as an effective way to prevent disease. Piedmont College will be participating in the event by holding a handwashing exercise in the Commons, as well as hosting a TikTok video competition for students.

To spread awareness for effective handwashing, order free handwashing posters to enlighten others on the importance of fighting off germs by washing your hands. For more information on handwashing: https://www.cdc.gov/handwashing/index.html .

National handwashing day is dedicated to increasing awareness and importance of handwashing with soap as an effective way to prevent disease.

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I just wanted to be liked.

Jaela Dodson

Mass Communications. Theatre. Debate. Yearbook. CAB. NSLS. SAIL. 

At a young age, I was always futuristic, always outgoing, and always curious about the future. I was a happy kid, excited for the future, and rarely had a bad day. Everything was always in my favor and life seemed simple.

From the time of elementary school, I collectively had lots of friends. I was extremely outgoing, so much that my brother would make me ring the doorbell of all the neighborhood kids to come out and play. I knew nearly every kid in the neighborhood. I could easily walk up to new people and engage in warm conversation without feeling awkward. My extroverted personality made me susceptible for a large social network. Self-image and my personality were never things I was uncomfortable with. In fact, I was more than confident. 

By middle school, I became even more extroverted due to social media influence. Around this age social media was at its peak. Every middle schooler had an I-pod or smartphone with the ability to text or download the latest social media apps. Instagram, Snapchat and Facebook were the main social media platforms for middle schoolers. Everyone wanted the most followers, likes, friends, comments and views. Most of the time, we never knew who we were friends with. Sometimes it would be friends of friends, kids in the same grade or school as us, kids from other schools, or even other kids from the same city. Middle school social media was the spark of my stressor. Overwhelming anxiety weighed over me. How much of a social media influence can I contribute? Competition struck on whose pictures looked the most aesthetically pleasing, and who’s page had the most everything. The more followers, likes, and comments, the more socially acceptable you were. Outside of social media I had a large social network and was well liked and accepted, but it did not matter if I could not prove it online.

Constantly on edge I questioned myself.  Did I get enough likes? Should I delete it since I only got 100 views? Maybe I need more comments? How many followers should I try to get this week? The social life I once lived in person, strictly became an online platform. 

In high school my confidence completely plummeted. The once outgoing, happy, extroverted girl now felt anxious and depressed at the hands of social media. My social life interactions were rigorously done behind a screen. No longer socializing in person, I quickly became introverted and lonely. Unbearable anxiety to be and live the perfect Instagram model life. The excruciating anxiety lead me to thoughts and feelings of suicide, never feeling good enough. The future became a blur to me. I was miserable trying to keep up with the image of myself I wanted that I stopped feeling like I was living. The dreadful life I started living behind a screen made my real life never feel good enough. Never feeling good enough sent me on edge resulting in numerous failed overdose suicide attempts. 

Research shows that Social Media Hurts Girls More Than Boys. Experts evaluated social media as the trigger for a list of mental health issues including depression, anxiety and suicidal behavior among youth. I was not surprised by the article’s conclusions. Many other girls in my age range suffered mental illness due to the stress of social media. Social media’s role is to help people discover and learn new information, share ideas, interact with new people. Although communication has made daily life easier, it has changed the way people live their life – some for good – some for bad. 

Often, I feel I am a victim of social media drowning. At one point my life was utterly controlled by the influence of social media. The confidence and happiness I once had was destroyed. My life never felt satisfied no matter many followers, likes, or comments I received. Anxiety became my new normal, and I had no way out. 

Five years later, I am now in college. With the help of counselors, I broke up with social media. The control social media once had on me was released. I have learned to be happy and confident with my image. Although I still deal with anxiety, it no longer weighs over my life. Looking back five years ago, I never would have thought I would be alive or where I am today. Social media broke me, but it also made me who I am today.


Social Media Hurts Girls More Than Boys

Sports Feature: New Practice Facility?

With Piedmont’s student population growing every year, one area that is feeling the space crunch is athletics.

Student athletes from 22 different sports are forced to use the same fitness center space to work on their craft, in addition to all other non-athlete students on campus. The college hopes a proposed new practice facility will help alleviate that space crunch.

“It will give the student athletes a better chance to get their work in, more space to get work done is always a plus,” sophomore baseball player Nolan Ledbetter said.

The college purchased 80 acres of land, expanding the campus’ size by a whole 25 percent and

Athletic Director Jim Peeples hopes construction will begin soon on the complex. “You will see dirt moving if board will approve that sometime this spring,” he said.

Although to the naked eye it appears as if work is not happening on the new complex, Peeples assures students that work is being done. The major roadblock is that the property borders protected wetlands.

“The biggest part is the topographical survey, which we already have done,“ Peeples said.

Student athletes are eager for the opportunity to have a dedicated space for their workouts. End with a quote on from another student athlete (freshman or sophomore) about their hopes for a new facility.

The 80 acre property is rumored to give way to a new softball field, a running track, and other athletic facilities. Further information has not been released. So while its arrival is much anticipated, the new facility is seemingly far from completion.

Contact Olivia Justus FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 

Cell Phone 404-558-5267 September _ 2020

Email ojustus1118@lions.piedmont.edu

Website www.piedmont.edu

  PIEDMONT COLLEGE GETS INVOLVED IN GLOBAL HANDWASHING DAY 

Students and faculty team together to celebrate the upcoming Global Handwashing Day 

Demorest, Georgia, Sept. 11, 2020- Students at Piedmont College will celebrate Global Handwashing Day on Thursday Oct. 15 to demonstrate the importance of washing your hands. 

The Mass Communications media writing class is banding together with biology professor Dr. Julia Schmitz and her microbiology class to develop an on-campus celebration of Global Handwashing Day. Schmitz wants students to understand the importance of handwashing with soap, rather than relying on hand sanitizer. 

“Soap is going to be better,” she said. “The difference is that hand sanitizer uses alcohol where soap basically has oils in it and it also has an alkaline base in it. Soap is going to break water tension so when you’re washing your hands, the bacteria tends to stick to the grease and oils that are on your hands. The soap acts as a mediator between the water and oil grease on your hands. When you rinse off the soap, it’s also going to rinse off the germs that are connected to the oils. That is why soap is actually better to use.” 

On Oct. 15, a station will be set up in the Commons that displays how much someone actually covers their hands in the 20 seconds they wash them. This will be shown by spreading ink all over gloved hands. Then they will proceed to wash their hands for 20 seconds. Additionally, a Tik Tok contest will be held for students, with prizes going to those who make the most creative video about washing hands. 

“The COVID-19 pandemic provides a stark reminder that one of the most effective ways to stop the spread of a virus is also one of the simplest: hand hygiene, especially through handwashing with soap” says The Global Public-Private Partnership

The Global Public- Private Partnership is emphasizing the importance of handwashing due to the current COVID-19 pandemic the world is going through currently. They explain that the simple action of washing your hands could potentially stop the spread of a virus. The organization is very firm about trying to end this pandemic and keeping individuals safe beyond it. They want handwashing to be a priority now and in the future. 

For more information about Global Handwashing Day and the event at Piedmont College, email Joe Dennis at jdennis@piedmont.edu

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About Piedmont College 

One of the most dynamic small colleges in the Southeast, Piedmont is an independent liberal arts college of more than 2,260 students. The college’s four schools—Arts & Sciences, Business, Education, and Nursing & Health Sciences—develop tomorrow’s leaders by engaging students in the classroom, in their community, and around the world. Founded in 1897, Piedmont offers bachelor’s, master’s, specialist, and doctoral degree programs at its Demorest residential campus in the foothills of the northeast Georgia mountains and at its Athens campus in the heart of Georgia’s Classic City. Information can be found at www.piedmont.edu

Global Hand washing Day

Global Hand Washing Day Professor Julia Schmitz informs students on proper hand washing techniques 

Demorest, Georgia, Sept. 2, 2020- In efforts to educate before the Global Hand Washing Day on Oct. 15, Piedmont College Microbiology ProfessorJulia Schmitz wants to educate students on the importance and effects of hand washing, and more importantly how to properly wash hands for it to be effective. 

“Making sure that people are going between their fingers and their thumbs is important,” she said.”Everything that we’re doing we will be touching our face with our hands.” 

Hand washing is crucial living through a pandemic, especially on a college campus. Covid tests are increasing weekly on campus, therefore knowing how to effectively wash hands is extremely important to ensure safety amongst the campus.It is more than common that individuals miss parts of their hands, do not use the correct products, or simply wash their hands incorrectly.On Global Hand Washing Day, Piedmont College hopes to teach students the proper ways to wash hands through a Tic Tok competition in which students can submit their educational and entertaining videos on handwashing.

“Probably the most often area where things would be left is your knuckles…underneath your nails, around your nail beds, underneath rings and jewelry, and thumbs,” she said. 

The hand washing practice is one students in the biology department take seriously.

“Even before the pandemic during biology labs we are expected to wash our hands consistently, but now it is more important than ever to wash our hands correctly and thoroughly,” said biology major, Cameron McDonald.

With all of this information, the biology and mass communications departments are teaming up to educate students at Piedmont during Global Hand Washing Day. Piedmont is hosting Tik Tok contests and social distancing events to educate students in an exciting manner on the positive and negative effects of washing hands. To engage students in participating in the hand washing events, winners and prizes will be given to those who create a creative video on the correct ways to wash hands. For more information on the National Hand Washing Day events, email Joe Dennis at jdennis@piedmont.edu

About Piedmont College

One of the most dynamic small colleges in the Southeast, Piedmont is an independent liberal arts college of more than 2,260 students. The college’s four schools—Arts & Sciences, Business, Education, and Nursing & Health Sciences—develop tomorrow’s leaders by engaging students in the classroom, in their community, and around the world. Founded in 1897, Piedmont offers bachelor’s, master’s, specialist, and doctoral degree programs at its Demorest residential campus in the foothills of the northeast Georgia mountains and at its Athens campus in the heart of Georgia’s Classic City. Information can be found at http://www.piedmont.edu.

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“WHY DON’T THEY JUST STOP?”

Growing up, my sister and I were extremely close. We are nine years apart, so I looked up to her for almost everything. She was my best friend as a child and I wanted to be just like her. Though as I got older, I realized she was not as perfect as she seemed to be. 

As a young child I always associated drug addicts and alcoholics in a negative connotation. I never understood who these kinds of people were and why they did the things they did. The only things I could think of was these people are crazy and stupid. I always questioned “Why don’t they just stop?”  But I soon realized it is much deeper than that, it is a mental disorder and for many, professional help is essential and for addicts of many years, it is nearly impossible to stop on their own.

Still naive to the lifestyle of an addict, I found these kinds of people closer and closer to me. Before, I saw these people from a distance, on the way to vacation at a gas station or walking in downtown Atlanta, but I never thought I would experience it firsthand. I heard my parents talk of family friends and friends of friends going down the drug road, but I never thought I would experience such a thing until my older sister became addicted to heroin. 

It started in 2014 and it is still a battle to this day. It was confusing at first, but more so, it was heartbreaking. Watching this lifestyle and not knowing how to help broke my heart more than anything I could ever imagine. I would do anything to help and change my sister for the better. For many years, I was filled with anger because I thought that my own sister had betrayed me. I thought she did not love me enough to give up her addiction. However, as I educated myself, I soon understood that the drugs have taken over who my sister truly was. My sister and my sister on drugs were two completely different people. Freshman year of college the addiction became worse and I did not know how to handle it or help. As she was in and out of the hospitals due to overdoses, in and out of schizophrenic episodes, and in and out of detox, it was a long and brutal process to simply admit her into the facilities she needed. The person my sister was on drugs needed serious help. 

My family and I found that it was more than difficult to admit an addict into rehab without insurance than it was impossible to admit a schizophrenic over 18 into detoxification. It was also impossible to change the mind of an addict. After multiple stages of detox and state funded rehabilitation, staying clean is not the only problem for an addict, the addict needs professional help mentally as “drug addiction is a chronic brain disease”. Simply put, the brain needs support as well. The majority of individuals suffering from drug addiction cannot and will not survive in the real world with only a seven-day detox. They need aid in understanding who they are, and that life is possible without drug use. 

Additionally, a majority of addicts do not have jobs, homes, or money to start a new life after a week of detox. In this case, rehab centers are meant to help with this situation. However, in my sister’s case, she had no insurance and was in debt, therefore she was unable to pay the average of $20,000 for the impatient rehab that she desperately needed. Years upon years she battled relapses and schizophrenic episodes because my family could not afford to keep her in rehab for more than a month. Studies show that severe addicts need a 12-month impatient program in order to successfully stay sober.

The government and states need to make entering rehabilitation centers and mental facilities simpler, cheaper, and quicker for drug addicts. Funding for drug abuse should increase as in 2018 alone, more than 70,000 people died from drug overdose. Two out of three overdoses were opioid related. Each second that goes by for an addict is one step closer to an overdose. It should not be next to impossible for an individual with no insurance to be admitted into detoxification: most addicts probably do not have insurance in the first place. My sister was lucky to have a supportive family, but most addicts do not have the support of a family, therefore giving an easy outlook to drug addicts straight out of detox is essential. 

Addicts cannot be kicked straight to the street after only seven days of being clean, they need support mentally as well as aid in getting back on their feet.