Digital Fabrication Lab

Not known to many people on campus, the Digital Fabrication Lab – also known as the Fab Lab – is where students learn how to manufacture through the process of machines. For students who love to cut things, create things, creatively solve problems and want to know programming and coding, this is the place.

“We can print something three-dimensionally, we can cut something with a laser or we can cut something with a router,” said professor Chris Kelly, Director of Art and overseer of the Fabrications Lab. “Everything in here comes out of the digital world.”

It was brought over to Piedmont by graphic design major Rebekah Kanipe, who took a two-week workshop at Penland School of the Arts and Crafts in North Carolina in 2018. In this workshop, she learned how to use computer aided design and computer aided machining  – also known as CAD and CAM technology – with laser cutting, solely on wood. This year, the program was brought over to Piedmont, and since starting the Fab Lab, Kanipe has made multiple innovative chairs and has taught other students of Piedmont on how to use the items in the lab.

Along with the ability to make innovative chairs, the laser cutter can also engrave to the tiniest detail on the side of a yeti cup. Along with the laser cutter in the fab lab comes a 3D printer, a paper cutter and sensory technology kits.

 “I want to make a lamp you could turn on by licking it,” said Hannah Oliver, who is working on building a lamp that turns on and off by the moisture in the tongue.

Other projects by students using sensory technology are a sensory piano and a rotating ballerina that switches direction with each tap.

“The idea is to solve problems,” said Kelly. “Students come in with problems and solve them.”

One of the main foci of the fab lab is to find solutions to everyday problems. A couple of the students made a cutting board with a measuring cup attachment to measure the food as it is being cut.

“It doesn’t have to be reasonable, it just has to solve the problem,” said Raleigh Wunderlich for her invention of solving the problem for Pringles cans. She plans to have an automated tube that pushes up the snack as chips are taken, as to not get one’s hand stuck half way through eating Pringles.

With Kanipe’s chair, she had to make multiple mockup models to find out if the chair was stable or not before she could make the real, life-size chair.

“It’s not necessarily an art class. It’s not a design class. It’s not a business class.” Said professor Kelly about the Intro to Digital Fabrication course. “But hopefully students from all the different majors can use this course to create stuff for their work.”

The fab lab is not exclusive to one major. Although it may be in the art annex building, the lab is not just for art majors. Theater Major Shanna Ward uses the router cutter to create faster and more efficient sets for plays.

“As we’re discovering what can be made within these walls, the idea is that you can make anything you want with the help of the digital world,” Kelly said.

Advertisements

RR9

In Filkas chapter 12 and 13 he talks about the different rights you have and should follow and also different ethic approaches.

It’s important to know what ethics you should follow and also why they matter. The Golden Mean is very helpful to know because it helps journalists find a happy medium with whoever they’re interviewing. Finding a balance between people is a good approach to writings. Ignorance is a risky area for journalists. Whether or not to release a story for someone being in jail as a star player somewhere, is a tough call to make. Being honest in your stories is very helpful and beneficial. Although we have freedom of speech, we as journalists can’t stray too far from the truth due to the backlash you or your company may get for publishing a certain story.

Filak tells us many do’s and don’ts in these two chapters and i do find them both very helpful.

Reading Response 9

In chapter 12 Filak talks about the first amendment right and in what ways they protect Journalist. As Journalist we can’t go around thinking we can say whatever we want. But we do have rights that are protected under the constitution to protect us from companies or people if you expose their wrong doing .

Chapter 13 Filak talked about Ethics. Honesty is the most important ethic a Journalist can have. Journalist who go around lying about lying or spreading fake news are the worst. Morally Journalist should know what is right and wrong to do in their writing.

Women’s Soccer feature story

Head Coach Timmy McCormack is ushering in a culture of success for the Piedmont college women’s soccer team.

“When you look at successful programs, at any level, it has a lot to do with what the culture is like in those programs to whether or not you are successful,” said Coach Timmy McCormack. “And that’s one of those things we put a ton of time into in our program.”

Since Coach McCormack took over as head coach in 2017 after eight years of being assistant coach, the Piedmont women’s soccer team has seen nothing but success. In his first season as head coach, McCormack guided his team to an undefeated regular season, but lost a close game in the conference tournament. Then in 2018 the Lady Lions got their revenge and won the USA South conference tournament for the fifth time in school history. Like many other coaches, McCormack doesn’t take credit for the success.

“I don’t think it’s my coaching as much as we just have had really good players,” said McCormack. “I think we’ve been really lucky to have a lot of really good foundational success.”

These really good players McCormack talks about have helped lead to an impressive 33-5-5 record in the last two seasons. And the talent won’t be stopping any time soon as the soccer team has 15 incoming freshmen to help win the conference title again.

“The main reason I came here was for Timmy,” said freshman defender Madison Comer. “A lot of schools have great programs, but Timmy’s personality is what convinced me to come to Piedmont.”

Coach McCormack, or Timmy as all his players, call him is loved by the girls on his team for being one of the kindest, caring and best coaches they’ve ever played for. Comer was recruited by McCormack and got to be a part the championship team. She said that freshman will room with seniors on trips to bring the team together and make the older girls seem “not seem as scary.” This strategy brought the team together and helped unite team the for their championship run.

“We’ve all grown up with Timmy,” said sophomore midfielder Abby Cox. “We’ve been trained to always try hard in both practices and the games, you play for the team not yourself.”

Cox has played for McCormack for both of his seasons as head coach, she got to watch the changes he made after losing the conference tournament her freshman year, and what it took to win it this past season. Abby also credits the California trip the team took this season for helping bring the team together. Getting to go some place new and having these experiences is another way the team was brought together to have this culture of success.

McCormack said it’s these little things that lead to the overall success.

“Championships are not won in that season; they are won by doing the detail things day in and day out. You can have the pain of discipline or the pain of regret, you take your pick.”  

Lions Pride: 2019 Alternative Spring Break

Instead of taking a traditional style Spring Break, a group of Piedmont College students embarked on a journey to help build houses for the Habitat for Humanity in Sebring, Florida.

“The goal of the Alternative Break program at Piedmont College is to provide students, faculty, and staff with a service opportunity outside of the Habersham County area,” said Dr. Kim Crawford, Associate Dean of Student Life.

Not just any regular Piedmont College student can attend an alternative spring break. The requirements are having a minimum GPA of 3.0, submit a student resume in person to the Director of Career Education, Lisa Mann, and get recommended by two Piedmont faculty or staff members. The total number of students that got to attend this year’s alternative spring break was 11.

“The application process required students to submit an essay on why they wanted to go on the trip and students had to complete a Compass Reflection form after the trip; to talk about their experience,” said Megan Ramsey, Compass Program Coordinator.

Students were asked to answer why they wanted to attend and even took the time to reflect on their personal experience and share anything they learned or took away from the trip.

Nicole Thomas, a junior mass communications major, said she loved to bond with others while volunteering and this experience is a great way to travel.

“This opportunity allowed me to learn more leadership skills and increased my appreciation of diversity,” said Thomas.

Savannah Cantrell, a junior art education major, emphasized that the 2019 Alternative Spring Break was one of the most humbling and rewarding activities she has ever participated in during her time at Piedmont. Although she worked hard each day, she reminded herself that these homes were potentially going to someone whose home was destroyed or have never owned their home.

“I learned to work alongside other Piedmont students while developing new relationships with the other team members on the construction site. The relationships I have built impacted me whether it was a Piedmont student, a Habitat for Humanity worker, or a Caravanner,” said Cantrell.

Alyssa Emmet, a junior mass communications major, said she found herself during this trip and capitalized on meeting people she would have never met without this trip.

“I learned several facts about Habitat for Humanity and found out I’m capable of doing more than I thought,” said Emmet.

Ashley Dean, a sophomore nursing major, found the opportunity to meet and work alongside many great people who are selfless with their time heartwarming.

“The most rewarding part of this whole experience was getting to meet some of the families that will be living in these houses that we helped to build,” said Dean.

Leslie Lopez, a sophomore business marketing major and graphic design minor always wanted to volunteer. She found that alternative spring break would be the perfect opportunity to explore and meet new people that have been volunteers for a while now.

“Alternative Spring Break reminded me to appreciate all the opportunities that I have. It also showed me the true meaning of “all help counts,” said Lopez.

Areli Albarran, a sophomore nursing major, applied because she wanted help to enhance her sense of vocation through the community service.

“Through the Alternative Spring I strengthened my leadership, communication, problem-solving skills,” said Albarran.

In the end, the students who attended the trip learned many things from home improvement to self-improvement, but one thing that will stay hard to perfect is to become one.

“It can be difficult for everyone to be on the same page, said Albarran.

Reading Response 9: Ethics and Law

In theses chapters Filak goes into depth about the laws that are in place to help and protect reporters, as well as guidelines to be followed to avoid lawsuits. While the First Amendment seems iron clad, it does have gaps in which reporters can get in trouble for incorrect or misleading information shared to readers. Laws are ever changing, and keeping updated on them is a good idea to help avoid complications. Knowing your rights as a reporter is important in this regard as news of any length can cause trouble. A reporter must remain true when writing or be put at risk of being found Libel for a defamatory piece.

Being ethical when writing is required to avoid issues with publishers and readers. Reporting is a give and take relation ship between reporters and the people, where the people give information in exchange for a future article on the information. The warping of words should not be undertaken in this instance to avoid damaging credibility. Being upfront about reporting should also be done to insure retaliation for false defamation doesn’t occur. A reporter must also refuse being manipulated so their credibility remains intact. Bribes, favors, and special treatment should be avoided to help do so.


RR9

Freedom of the press doesn’t exactly give writers the ability to publish whatever they want. Freedom of the Press means that journalists have the right to publish truthful and trusted articles. Several laws are in place, like the Communications Decency Act of 1996 and the Sunshine Act, to ensure ethical. Privacy, slander, and libel are all issues that fall under decency laws.

Filak discusses the dilemma in being able to publish an article and whether you should or not.